• 1 1/2 lbs of boneless white fish
  • 1/4 roasted chestnuts {can or bag}
  • 1/4 ground flax
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • handful chopped chives
  • 1/2 tsp paprika
  • 1/2 tsp pink Himalayan salt
  • 1/8 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/8 tsp cayenne pepper
  • ground pepper to taste
  • 1 tbsp. coconut oil
  • extra for frying
  • coconut oil or avocado oil
  • Topping:
  • 1/4 cup roasted chestnuts
  • 2 shallots or small onion
  • 1/2 pomegranate
  • pinch pink Himalayan salt

 

Do you ever look in your pantry and try to throw something together and end up creating a winner for dinner?!  Well that is what happened here folks!  I should confess this is my third attempt at the egg and grain free fish cakes! However, the topping is clearly the highlight that was made on a whim.

I think food should be pretty, taste good and serve the purpose of feeding our bodies nutrition!  That is exactly what this dish is all about!  My daughter loved the hand held mini cakes and they serve nicely as an appetizer.

I love the option to make these cakes larger for the dinner plate or smaller for a nibble!  I am excited to share this festive recipe at my upcoming gatherings and I hope you will enjoy them too!

Oh and about that pomegranate, you might be wondering if you can eat the seeds?  The arils {seeds} are the edible part.  Even though they have a bit of a crunch to them, they are digestible and packed with antioxidants and health benefits.

My daughter loves picking the seeds out to eat them….WARNING they are messy but so juicy.  In the market they should have a “buyer beware” label on them because they will turn a white shirt splattered red instantly ready for Christmas or Halloween…..depends on how you look at it {wink}.

 

 

 

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Chestnut and Pomegranate Fish Cakes {paleo, nut, dairy & egg free}
 
Prep time

Cook time

Total time

 

Author:
Serves: 8-15

Ingredients
  • 1½ lbs of boneless white fish
  • ¼ cup roasted chestnuts {can or bag}
  • ¼ cup ground flax
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • handful chopped chives
  • ½ tsp paprika
  • ½ tsp pink Himalayan salt
  • ⅛ tsp garlic powder
  • ⅛ tsp cayenne pepper
  • ground pepper to taste
  • 1 tbsp. coconut oil
  • extra for frying
  • coconut oil or avocado oil
  • Topping:
  • ¼ cup roasted chestnuts
  • 2 shallots or small onion
  • ½ pomegranate
  • pinch pink Himalayan salt

Instructions
  1. If you are preparing these to eat right away start with the topping.
  2. In a small frying pan add a little oil on low- medium heat.
  3. Julianne the onion, dice the chestnuts and add to frying pan.
  4. Cut the pomegranate and scoop out half of the seeds. *read notes
  5. When onion is caramelized add the pomegranate seeds and cook for few min.
  6. Turn off heat and cover.
  7. To make the cakes- In a food processor purée all the ingredients, until it is creamy.
  8. In a large frying pan on medium heat add a few tablespoons of oil.
  9. Form mini cakes with 2 tbsp mixture and larger ones with about 4 tbsp.
  10. When you see arks around perimeter of pan it is hot enough for cakes.
  11. Cook larger ones 5-8 minutes each side and smaller ones no longer than 5 minutes.
  12. When you have a slight golden color they are done. Add topping and serve.
  13. If you are preparing this for another time. You can let them cool and refrigerate both.

Notes
If you don’t have a food processor you can use a blender to puree ingredients. The high speed break down the fish fibers and helps bind it together since we are not using eggs. I love the option to make {12-15} mini cakes or {8} larger ones. I have found bagged and can chestnuts in the market but you can roast them too {a it more time consuming but yummy}! However, make sure to poke holes in them or they will explode and make a mess in your oven. Cutting a pomegranate can be very messy to cut; so wearing an apron is a safe bet and not white. There are some great u-tube videos how to cut them but I personally didn’t have the patience and cut it in half and scooped out the seeds. In case you were wondering the arils or seeds are completely edible and are packed with nutrition! Please use organic where you can and wild-caught fish is the best choice.

With a Spoonful of Health,

Dawn-Signature1