• 3 large sweet onions
  • 8 cups bone broth/or water
  • recipe below for broth
  • 2 leeks
  • 1 bulb garlic
  • 3 tsp pink Himalayan sea salt
  • handful of fresh chives
  • Kelp

Let me just start off by telling you I am not a fan of French Onion Soup but I came across a recipe and was aghast at the ingredients and sodium! It was almost taunting me to make it because in my head I was already mulling over healthier ingredients!

I did love the culinary picture though, with all that gooey cheese, but I know many of you are dairy-free so I did two versions of this recipe to accommodate everyone!  I was so surprised that I actually can say I liked this French Onion Soup. Perhaps because it was a labor of love and I was invested in giving this traditional recipe a makeover!

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The kelp and leeks add additional flavor and certainly their share of nutrients, right along side the main feature of onions!  I love adding kelp to my soups because of its super natural vitamins , amino acids and trace minerals  like iodine, manganese, iron, zinc to name just a few.

I also gave this recipe some extra OOMPH in the nutrition department by using a beef bone broth.  It is a sight to see the enormity of the beef bones in your crock pot so beware my vegan friends.

If you haven’t heard about the latest rage of bone broth it is everything they say about it and more!  This nutrient dense broth has calcium, magnesium, potassium and is rich in many amino acids.

We often sip it between meals to boost immunity, especially if we are feeling run down or God forbid, sick.  I have some in the freezer for any sneaky viruses that may attack.

 

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If you love soy sauce I highly recommend you switch to this healthier version! It has so much to offer in the health department!

 

My French Onion Soup & Bone Broth {paleo, dairy and gluten free}
 
Prep time

Cook time

Total time

 

Author:
Serves: 6-10

Ingredients
  • 3 large sweet onions
  • 8 cups bone broth/or water
  • recipe below for broth
  • 2 leeks
  • 1 bulb garlic
  • 3 tsp pink Himalayan sea salt
  • handful of fresh chives
  • Kelp
  • ¼ cup coconut aminos

Instructions
  1. In a large 8 quart pot fill it with 8 cups filtered water or bone broth. Julienne onions, cut garlic and chives and add to soup. Add salt, pepper to taste.
  2. Cut leeks and wash in between layers as often dirt gets stuck. Use the bottom thick white part.
  3. I like to use the green part of the leek for flavor and take it out before serving.
  4. Bring ingredients to a boil then reduce heat to simmer for 20 minutes and turn off heat with lid on.
  5. Add kelp and coconut aminos last.
  6. Optional: but gives the soup a thicker base: Puree 2 cups of soup with kelp and add back to soup.
  7. Serve with shredded cheese on top or cut herbs.

Notes
I like to make the bone broth ahead of time and freeze it or knowing that in the next few days I will be making a soup and using this as it’s base. Bone broth is super flavorful and packed with nutrition. However, using water in this recipe will lend to flavor on its own especially for my vegan friends. If you don’t have the coconut aminos {alternative to soy sauce} you can omit it but it does add the brown traditional color to this onion soup and extra flavor. Most health food markets carry this. If you omit it add extra salt. Adding shredded cheese gives that authentic Onion Soup flare but this soup is tasty alone. Goat cheese is my favorite and I put my oven safe bowl with cheese under the broiler for a few minutes to brown it.

 

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My French Onion Soup & Bone Broth {paleo, dairy and gluten free}
 
Author:

Ingredients
  • 4-5 lbs of beef bones
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • water
  • 6 cloves garlic
  • 1 sliced onion
  • kelp strips or 1 tbsp.
  • 2 tsp pink Himalayan sea salt
  • pepper to taste

Instructions
  1. Add bones to a crockpot or 6 qt. pot and pour lemon juice over bones. Fill to ¾ full with water.
  2. You can start on high temperature and drop it low after you see gentle rolling simmer.
  3. Keep that gentle rolling simmer for up to 6 hours but as long as 24 if you desire.
  4. If you simmer closer to only 6 hours be sure to use the bones a second time around.
  5. Within a few hours you will see a white foam that you will skim off.
  6. The last ½ hour or so you can add garlic, onions, spices, kelp and other vegetables.
  7. For stove top bring 8 qt. pot to a boil and simmer for an hour than turn to low heat for 6-10 hrs.
  8. After cooked you can use it for a soup base freeze some or drink it daily for it’s nutrition.
  9. If freezing be sure to leave a few inches from the top to liquid can expand.

Notes
After much research, and playing around with recipes I wanted to share some updates. Adding chicken bones, feet, neck etc. will help broth to gel and since this post I have frozen leftover chicken carcasses to add to my bone broth recipe.

Some trouble shooting awareness I learned was boiling your broth too long will not allow it to gel however, you do need to bring the crock pot (or stove top pot} to a gentle rolling simmer and then drop it to lower temperature after 6-12 hours. Using too much water and not enough bones can be the determining factor of a bone broth not gelling. Many of the experts say even though it doesn’t gel there is probably still some collagen in your soup and will ultimately have all the other healing nutrients and amino acids like glycine, glycosaminoglycans and glutamine! That is a lot of G’s for GOODNESS! And if the “G” in your gelling isn’t happening don’t obsess about it like everyone else just sip your soup and know it is doing your body GOOD!

If you are bent on getting your broth to jiggle you can always add 1 tbsp. of gelatin for every quart of water and then you know your getting extra collegen! Let us not forget some other basic nutritional components of bone broth minerals like magnesium, potassium and phosphorus. Also, avoid using an aluminum pot when making your broth and truthfully I would never cook in aluminum for the obvious health reasons. It is not as tricky as it sounds but show yourself some grace as you find your way in the bone broth world. Please consider using organic grass-fed beef bones for many reasons especially that they are less acidic.

 

With a Spoonful of Health,

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